Q:

Should schools charge full fees for the period of home tuition?

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Camilla Macun
ADCB
26 Mar 2020

A: SenseCheck

  • 0 Yes
  • 2 Unclear
  • 2 No
SenseCheck complexity

Newest Answer Oldest Answer

  • 16 Apr 2020
  • Unclear

    Complex

    This issue is too new - watch this space.: As time moves on, if school will be saving money and this should be passed onto parents.

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    Rachel Amos
    The Senate

  • Comment

  • 15 Apr 2020
  • Unclear

    Simple

    Other ...: To quote the FTs recent article, 6 April 2020:
    "Melanie Sanderson, managing editor of the Good Schools Guide, said: “There are mutterings all over the place and lists circulating by parents of fee discounts, most of which are not accurate.” She said many private day schools had offered 10-20 per cent cuts for the summer term, and after Eton cut its fees by 30 per cent, other boarding schools began to do the same. But some have still held out."
    https://www.ft.com/content/f9289e61-024c-4f0…

    In addition, Julie Robinson, chief executive of the Independent Schools Council, explains some struggles the schools face. "schools will also lose holiday letting income while the government’s furlough measures to compensate suspended employees would have limited benefit, since they would not apply to staff who continued to teach but only to administrative or other employees whose work had stopped."

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    Tamsin Ogilvie
    The Senate

  • Comment

  • 31 Mar 2020
  • No

    Simple

    Reduced service should result in reduced fees, as with any other provider - it will be difficult for schools to defend full fees when they are unable to provide eg any extracurricular activities. Also some subjects such as drama and art have limited success through online tutoring.

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    Jan Edmunds
    The Senate

  • Comment

  • 30 Mar 2020
  • Yes

    Simple

    During these unprecedented times, you would support your favourite restaurant, by having your meal as a take out rather than an eat in. And pay a similar price for yoga classes online to live, because at heart it is about the people. If the same teachers, with the same skills, are providing these services online instead of face to face, in the short term, then education is still being made available. It is showing loyalty and support.

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    Tamsin Ogilvie
    The Senate

  • Comment

  • 30 Mar 2020
  • Unclear

    Complex

    Other ...:

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    Rachel Amos
    The Senate

  • Comment

  • 30 Mar 2020
  • No

    Complex

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    Rachel Amos
    The Senate

  • Comment

  • 29 Mar 2020
  • Comment

  • 27 Mar 2020
  • No

    Simple

    Using the U.K. as an example and applying it's government business support scheme, I think that a business not able to provide a service in it's normal capacity but has its cost base subsidised by a government, it should then pass the effect of that subsidy onto its clients as a reduced fee for its services. In effect the subsidy of staff costs is acting like a revenue stream that substitutes the revenue from clients. It could also be argued that it's profit margin on the fees should be cut too in order to pass more savings to clients.

    I believe that that approach mitigates the effect on the people that will ultimately keep the school in business (its clients) whilst also enabling it's staff to retain some income and pay into the broader economy.

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    John Bartley
    The Senate

  • Comment

  • 27 Mar 2020
  • Unclear

    Complex

    This issue is too new - watch this space.: The costs for the schools have not gone down so it's hard to see why the fees should, particularly as they may have extra costs (staff sickness etc). However if the govt is paying the wage bill, that saving should be passed onto parents.

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    Rachel Amos
    The Senate

  • Comment