Q:

icon

Mary Edmunds
28 Mar 2020

A: SenseCheck

  • 3 Yes
  • 0 Unclear
  • 0 No
SenseCheck complexity

Newest Answer Oldest Answer

  • 03 May 2020
  • Yes

    Very Complex

    Seeds of change?:"In another sign of rising British interest in European cooperation, the Guardian has established that the UK attended all five of the EU’s health security committee meetings on the coronavirus pandemic in April, a perfect attendance record, compared with a 70% British presence between 17 January and 30 March."https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2020/ma…

    icon

    Rachel Amos
    The Senate

  • Comment

  • 18 Apr 2020
  • Unclear

    Very Complex

    This issue is too new - watch this space.: I wish I could say yes but based on yesterday's refusal it is unclear. See @iandunt on the question yesterday. https://www.politics.co.uk/blogs/2020/04/17/…

    icon

    Rachel Amos
    The Senate

  • Comment

  • 17 Apr 2020
  • Yes

    Very Complex

    Very difficult to imagine that the UK government currently focused on the massive health and economic crisis triggered by the coronavirus would have the capacity to also focus on renegotiating complex trading relationships, for example. Even if deals could be agreed in a further condensed time frame, it is not clear how the new arrangements could be implemented with the additional constraints imposed by Covid-19 https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/articles/2…

    icon

    Sandra Norman
    The Senate

  • Comment

  • 31 Mar 2020
  • Yes

    Very Complex

    Definitely. The timeframe to negotiate the trade deal was tight anyway but cut 3+ months out of it due to C19 and it's looking like a mountain to climb. In addition, every country in Europe will be impacted financially, which may mean that any financial latitude (already limited prior to C19) is likely to disappear. "No deal" may be becoming more likely by the day.

    icon

    Adrian Smith
    The Senate

  • Comment

  • 29 Mar 2020
  • Yes

    Very Complex

    Although at the moment the UK Govt is in denial about it. I think it will impact both (a) negotiations and (b) the understanding of the UK public of what a massive shock to supply lines looks like....as well as disruption in labour markets. Its like watching an A level politics and economics question in real time!

    icon

    Rachel Amos
    The Senate

  • Comment