Q:

Has the Coronavirus crisis given to a rise in innovation in legal technology, or is it merely stop-gap while people try to cope and keep law firms viable?

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Sarah Gold
Gold Law Firm
09 Apr 2020

A: SenseCheck

  • 2 Yes
  • 2 Unclear
  • 0 No
SenseCheck complexity

Newest Answer Oldest Answer

  • 08 Jun 2020
  • Unclear

    Complex

    This issue is too new - watch this space.:

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    Rachel Amos
    The Senate

  • Comment

  • 08 Jun 2020
  • Yes

    Complex

    I believe a long term change is going to follow.

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    Rachel Amos
    The Senate

  • Comment

  • 03 Jun 2020
  • Unclear

    Complex

    Other ...: Beyond the initial benefits of new tech adoption, it will depend on the length of lockdown as to whether behavioural changes will become ingrained habits.

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    Tamsin Ogilvie
    The Senate

  • Comment

  • 03 Jun 2020
  • Yes

    Complex

    Joanna Goodman at the Law Gazette has an upbeat take on changes, and predicts we have passed the point of no return on tech such as zoom with distributed working proving to be effective. ‘Remote meetings and calls have become more personable’ and the need for premium office space being challenged in the light of falling profits. https://www.lawgazette.co.uk/analysis/lockdo…

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    Tamsin Ogilvie
    The Senate

  • Comment

  • 04 May 2020
  • Yes

    Complex

    My take on this is that the crisis hasn't necessary given rise to innovation, but it has most definitely highlighted the need for it. Law firms (and the law) have in the past been very guilty of trying to keep the "old normal", well, normal. I'm really looking forward to a more accessible, tech-enabled future.

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    Adrian Smith
    The Senate

  • Comment

  • 23 Apr 2020
  • Yes

    Complex

    I would say that there are potentially 3 waves to this question. As we moved into a global lockdown there was certainly been a movement in the short-term (or the first wave) to rapidly adopting more technology at law firms, particularly software/hardware that facilitated remote working. Most firms have accomplished this and are now in the second wave of looking at innovative ways for them to carry on serving their clients, with technology usually at the core. Given what I am seeing in the market currently, I would expect there to be some really exciting new technology/people/process innovations that occur during this wave (albeit a lot of them driven out of necessity). So I would say a resounding 'yes' for the those two waves. However, as we enter the third wave, coming out of lockdown and striving for some sort of business normality, my concern is that firms will very quickly fall back to age old habits and some (if not a lot) of the innovation will be lost when it is no longer considered 'necessary' (as old methods work again). The tech innovation of the first two waves could well end up being a 'stop-gap', and I think that is where firms need to focus energy to make sure that they evolve out of this crisis, not just survive and return 'back to normal'.

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    Guy Adams
    Intapp

  • Comment